Simulacrum Press #1: ‘Zoning Cycle’ by Sacha Archer

IMG_4971The inaugural publication from Simulacrum Press is Sacha Archer’s Zoning Cycle. It is in an edition of 5 boxes. Each box contains 370 light-weight, loose cards.

In Zoning Cycle, each day of the year is allocated a unique set of 4 co-ordinates. Each set of co-ordinates acts to demarcate an event-zone which is active only on its given day. All speech which occurs within an active event-zone is part of the poem; a poem located somewhere between the imagined and the actual.

Sacha Archer is an ESL instructor, childcare provider, writer, and visual artist.. His work has appeared in journals such as filling Station, h&, illiterature, NōD, FIVE:2:ONE, UTSANGA, Matrix, and Word for/Word. Archer’s first full-length collection of poetry, Detour, a conceptual work with the Dao De Jing as the source text, was published by gradient books (2017). His most recent chapbooks are, The Insistence of Momentum (The Blasted Tree, 2017), and upROUTE (above/ground press, 2017). He reviews, interviews and writes what he pleases at sachaarcher.wordpress.com. Archer lives in Burlington, Ontario.

Zoning Cycle can be purchased here.

SIMULACRUM

Simulacrum Press is now! Be… be… be… beginning! And welcome, all who somehow find yourselves at this press.

Simulacrum Press is run solely by Sacha Archer (sachaarcher.wordpress.ca). So, yes, it is a (very) small outfit and will do what it can with the means it has. I am extremely excited to see what this little experiment is to become–as it is an experiment–I am proceeding through the dark. Simulacrum will be publishing chapbooks, broadsides and ‘special projects’–and likely, a little later on, I’ll begin full-length print-on-demand collections–but not at this time.

What kind of work will Simulacrum publish? I’m looking generally for experimental, avant-garde works of POETRY POETRY and only POETRY. But what poetry is exactly… In theory I’m looking for works of poetry which do not really resemble poetry–and that that is vague is, perhaps, good.

Obviously, as time moves forward, the works published through Simulacrum will serve as more and more of a guide for the kind of work I’m looking for–hopefully never arriving at a overtly clear definition.

Who knows what will happen.

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